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The Rewired Retirement and Life Plan Communities: Perfect Together

By July 11, 2019 August 19th, 2019 No Comments

Retirement is changing because today’s and tomorrow’s retirees are different. They’ve rewired retirement, and Life Plan Communities are a catalyst.

Forty years ago, you might have led highly… well, retired lifestyles. A bit of golf. Maybe some bowling. And far more sitting at bridge tables along with a good deal of sedentary TV watching.

But new retirees have rewired retirement, and Life Plan Communities are changing along with them. Sure, seniors still do sit, but current retirees and the coming onrush of Baby Boomers are leaving the idea of a quiet retirement at the discarded bingo table.

Lifestyle expectations changed during your working years: travel and lifestyle choices grew, as did life expectancies. Now, healthy retirees are engaged and active and no longer pulling up a chair to perpetually watch the sun set.

You have high expectations and are not thinking the least bit about retreating during retirement. As you simplify your lives by downsizing, any move you make, either to a smaller home, apartment or independent living arrangement, must match how you perceive yourself.

For many, that’s active and engaged.

If you choose the independent living route, your future home and what it supports is realized in a Life Plan Community. Places like this, with multiple levels of care (if and when their needed) encompass the fresh outlook of contemporary retirement living and support how seniors perceive and execute the third, and best, phase of life.

Stay physical

Were you physically active before retirement? Then stick with it. If not, look at retirement (and additional time you have) as an opportunity to build in more regular exercise. Walking, lifting weights and cycling are good examples of moderate exercise can make your heart function younger than you are, which can enhance longevity.

And while these solitary activities are good, getting active while engaging with friends is better. More social interaction with a partner or with a group, such as in tennis, badminton and golf, are associated with the best longevity.

Continue Your Hobbies (Or find new ones)

What were your favorite pastimes before you retired — cooking, gardening, dancing, golf? Why stop now? In fact, now you can immerse yourself in your favorite pastimes and do the things you enjoy most. Numerous studies indicate that continuing old hobbies and taking up new ones keeps brains sharp. So, continue doing the things that give you satisfaction.

Try Something New

Retirement can be about sitting back a bit, but it’s also an opportunity to mix things up and try something new. Maybe learn a new language or travel somewhere you’ve never been. Redirect your purpose once you retire and redefine how you spend your time.

Go Back to School

Then there is active learning. Taking a course can reveal new discoveries and opportunities. Consider learning to play a musical instrument, writing computer code or engage in creative writing. A number of colleges and universities, including Ivy League schools, allow seniors to audit courses at no charge. Three Crowns Park residents, for example, take continuing education courses at the renowned and nearby Northwestern University in Evanston.
All of these kinds of activities help in adjusting to retirement living and the socialization opportunities that come with it, no matter what new living arrangement you have planned.

An advantage of a Life Plan Community is an abundance of planned activities, including community outings, socials events and much more. Because progressive Life Plan communities continually solicit resident feedback, you’ll be able to suggest activities or outings that appeal to you.

You have a life to live, and the best phase of life is yet to come. Finding new passions or continuing the ones you’ve established are part of staying active, engaged and vital.

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Enjoy your rewired retirement at Three Crowns Park! Explore the options call us at 847.905.1234 or send an email: info@threecrownspark.org.